lambda.cx blog Sharing notes with the internet

Expanding a Directory With Tab in Dired Mode

dired mode is one of my favourite features of Emacs. I use it so often, it's pretty much my go-to file browser. I use it both on my local machine, and on remote machines via TRAMP. One feature of dired is the ability to enter sub-directories in the same buffer by inserting the contents under the current directory. While this is useful, I often want something quicker to check the contents of a directory without either opening it in a new buffer, or inserting it below.

How To Set An Image Title In Hugo Using Org-Mode Markup

One of the differences between using markdown and org-mode markup for writing Hugo pages is how you set the alternative text and title of an image. In markdown, you would write it as ![alt text](dummy-image.png "Image Title") Where in org-mode, typically you would use a caption like this #+CAPTION: Image Title [[file:dummy-image.png]] and that would be the end of it. However in Hugo, if we use that format, we end up with this

Hugo Org-Mode Default Archetype

I love using Hugo to write. Their org-mode markup support is absolutely top notch. The only real problem with it is that while it's well supported, the Hugo docs don't cover it very much, as Markdown and TOML are the main markup and configuration languages. One of the basic building blocks for Hugo blogs are Archetypes. Archetypes get used as the templates for new posts, and get automatically filled out with the title of the post and creation date.

Using emacsclient on MacOS

Emacs is an amazing editor, but it can be a little slow to start sometimes. That's why emacsclient lets you run Emacs as a daemon and connect to it as a client, negating the startup time and letting you jump directly into editing. The two primary ways of getting Emacs onto your Mac are by either downloading it from Emacs For MacOS X or by installing it through homebrew using brew cask install emacs.

How To Stop mg From Littering

If you've been an OpenBSD user for any period of time, you probably know what mg is. For those who don't know, mg stands for MicroGnuEmacs. It's a small clone of Emacs maintained by the OpenBSD team that's included with the base system. Being an Emacs user, I love that mg is part of the OpenBSD base system. It's great to have an editor that has familiar keybinds on a system that I haven't had the time to install any packages on.

PC Engines APU Comparison

I've been looking at the PC Engines APU line for a while. They're a line of medium size single board PCs with a DB9 serial connector and no VGA port. They also have gigabit Ethernet. Because of this they're often used as firewall machines. I want to get one and use it as either the home router, or an experimental server to mess around with. Quite a few OpenBSD folks use them and recommend them as OpenBSD router and server hardware.

Let's Encrypt on OpenBSD 6.7

So I have an OpenBSD server serving a static website using httpd(8). I've been thinking for a while I should add an SSL certificate, but never got around to it because it was just a small hobby website and it didn't require any real attention. Today while watching one of the OpenBSD tutorials at BSDCan, I thought it was finally time. Since configuring everything else in OpenBSD is so easy, this must be easy too, right?

Issues with OpenVPN on OpenBSD 6.7

EDIT: (August 22, 2020) Theo Buehler has kindly reached out to me and informed me that this issue has just been fixed in a syspatch, and that OpenVPN now works correctly. Hi. Regarding https://blog.lambda.cx/posts/openvpn-issues-openbsd/, the issue you describe in this post should be fixed in 6.7-stable. It boils down to this: ProtonVPN appears to require clients to use P-521 for the TLSv1.3 key exchange.